Posts Tagged ‘ADP’

Santa Brings More Than 200,000 New Jobs in December

Monday, January 16th, 2012

The United States added more than 200,000 jobs in December of 2011, building on a strengthening employment market that dominated the second half of the year.  This brought the unemployment rate down to 8.5 percent from the revised 8.7 percent, which had been predicted in November.  The primary growth was in transportation — primarily courier services that hired for the holidays — healthcare and manufacturing, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

“It would have been even better without the drag from Europe,” said John Canally, economic strategist at LPL Financial, a stock brokerage firm. “The Europe situation created uncertainty, and uncertainty was used as a reason not to hire until now.”  The year ended even more strongly than economists had predicted.  They had forecast that employers would add a net 150,000 jobs in December, according to a survey by Factset. They also had predicted that the unemployment rate would tick up to 8.7 percent from November’s 8.6 percent; this is the lowest rate since March 2009.

In the end, November’s unemployment rate was revised up in this report, to 8.7 percent.  The better-than-expected monthly gain of 219,000 private-sector jobs means American businesses have replaced more than three million of the 4.2 million private-sector jobs that were lost the past 13 months. The private-sector jobs gained since employment bottomed in February of 2010 marks the strongest recovery since the 1990-1992 recession, when U.S. businesses added 4.2 million jobs in the same amount of time.

The new job numbers highlight the fact that the U.S. economy is on its way to recovery even as strains in Europe persist,” said David Watt, senior currency strategist at RBC Capital in Toronto. The fact that the labor market is gaining traction should be good news to the Obama administration, whose economic policies are relentlessly attacked by the political opposition.

This string of better-than-anticipated economic indicators has highlighted the stark contrast between the recovery in the world’s biggest economy and Europe, which faces bad times for months or even years.  Even with the good news, the American economy needs an even faster pace of job growth over a sustained period to make a noticeable dent in the pool of the 23.7 million people who remain out of work or underemployed in the wake of the 2007-09 recession.

December marked the 15th consecutive month that employment numbers have risen. Marcus Bullus, trading director at MB Capital, said: “That’s one hell of a number. Such an impressive fall in both the number of jobless Americans and the unemployment rate will cheer everyone bar Republican spin doctors.  The Obama administration could be forgiven for showboating over this convincing evidence that America’s economy is pulling away from Europe’s.  From a market perspective, strong US data like this will add to optimism, but nobody doubts the considerable downward pressure the Eurozone will continue to place on the global marketplace during 2012.”

Automatic Data Processing’s (ADP) numbers for December are even more impressive, saying the government added 325,000 jobs in December.  ADP’s figures do not always match the government’s, and economists warned that seasonal factors could have boosted the figures. Even so, all the major measures of the job market appear to be on the upswing.

Lasting payroll gains are needed to chip away at joblessness and support household spending, which accounts for approximately 70 percent of the world’s largest economy. The labor market figures come on the heels of recent data showing increased manufacturing and a rebound in consumer sentiment that show the U.S. is barely impacted by Europe’s debt crisis.  “You got the trifecta — more people working, wages up and the average work week up,” said Stuart Hoffman, chief economist at PNC Financial Services Group Inc., who accurately forecast the December payroll gains.  “You can’t really argue that that isn’t a sign of significant improvement in the job market.”

Yearly benchmark revisions showed the unemployment rate averaged 8.9 percent in 2011, down from 9.6 percent and 9.3 percent in the previous two years. It still ranks as the worst three-year period since 1939 to 1941.

Writing in the Wall Street Journal, Phil Izzo says the increase is “for real.” According to Izzo, “While the unemployment rate has been falling in part due to people leaving the labor force, a large portion of this month’s number appears to come from people finding jobs.

“The unemployment rate is calculated based on people who are without jobs, who are available to work and who have actively sought work in the prior four weeks. The actively looking for work’ definition is fairly broad, including people who contacted an employer, employment agency, job center or friends; sent out resumes or filled out applications; or answered or placed ads, among other things. The rate is calculated by dividing that number by the total number of people in the labor force.

“The key to the drop in the broader unemployment rate was due to a 371,000 drop in the number of people employed part time but who would prefer full-time work, that comes on top of big drops in that category over the past two months. That number could reflect people having their hours increased or part-time workers moving on to full time work,” Izzo concluded.

July Jobs Numbers Disappoint

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

ADP, a leading payroll services company, is reporting that private companies added 114,000 jobs in July.  Many analysts had projected an increase in hiring from June, but it is not likely that the unemployment rate will decline even if job growth rose sharply.  ADP’s forecasts are frequently used to measure how the labor economy is performing, but the firm has had its share of missteps, with some estimates on target and others varying sharply from actual government-issued data.  In June, ADP projected that more than 140,000 jobs were added.  The official government report showed that the labor economy had experienced anemic growth during the month, with a net total of only 18,000 jobs created.  Many economists and industry believe that private employers likely added more jobs than previously projected during July.

Not all the news was good, however. Employers announced 66,414 planned layoffs in July, an increase of 60.3 percent over the 41,432 announced in June, according to a report from consultants Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc.

Any gain or loss in jobs above 100,000 is considered statistically noteworthy by economists.  Expectations were rather low, however, given the recent bad news about GDP, consumer spending and manufacturing recently.  “We still expect that actual payrolls may have risen by around 50,000 in July,” according to Capital Economics.  “That would be better than the previous two months, but hardly reason for cheer.”  “This pace of job creation usually implies a steady unemployment rate,” according to ADP’s employment report.  Capital Economics said that the latest job gains would not reduce the unemployment rate.  “We are in a process of discovery over whether the slowdown we have seen since March in the U.S. is over and we are entering a new phase of faster growth or that we are in a slump,” said Francisco Torralba, economist at Morningstar Investment Management.

Recently released Institute of Supply Management (ISM) numbers indicate an economy that continues to move barely at a snail’s pace.  The non-manufacturing ISM report showed expanding business activity, new orders and employment, but at a slowing pace.  Planned layoffs reached a 16-month high while the private sector added 114,000 jobs in June, most of them in the small business and the services sector.  “Today’s report shows modest job creation for the month of July at a rate of half what is needed for meaningful employment and economic recovery,” said Gary C. Butler, Chief Executive Officer of ADP. Approximately half of June’s private sector job additions came from small business, which added 58,000 employees, and medium businesses (+47,000).  These statistics mesh with the Challenger, Gray & Christmas job-cuts report, which showed planned layoffs hitting a 16-month high on a “sudden and unexpected burst” in downsizing by large companies.  Merck, Borders, Cisco, Lockheed Martin, and Boston Scientific announced plans to cut 38,000 jobs in July, 58 percent of the 66,414 announced.   According to Dave Rosenberg, who is viewed by many as a perma-bear, it will be really hard for a self-sustaining recovery to pick up.  “The overhang of excessive debt burdens is still with us today and the problem with the government stimulus programs that were put into place is that they were not designed properly; the multiplier impacts never did kick in,” said Rosenberg. “So we can’t ‘grow’ our way out.  Now government sectors in nearly every jurisdiction are tightening their fiscal belts.  Companies and banks retain their extreme stash of cash, if we dare suggest, because they see the economic environment that we do and want to survive the next downturn.”

In the meantime, 400,000 Americans filed for first time unemployment claims in the last week of July, according to the Department of Labor.  Coupled with a revision of initial claims in the previous week to 401,000, the latest update means claims have yet to dip below the 400,000 mark for 17 weeks.

Writing for The Hill, Vicki Needham says that “Economists say these figures are in line with the economy’s slowing expansion and are expecting growth to accelerate through the second half of the year as temporary factors such as high gas prices fade.  While companies aren’t hiring, consumers are being cautious with their money, spending less for the first time in 20 months.  Consumer spending rose only 0.1 percent in the 2nd quarter and households tucked away more savings.”

Where’s Our Recovery? Job Growth and Productivity Falter

Monday, June 13th, 2011

Sluggish job growth in May could be a sign that the economic recovery is losing momentum.According to the ADP May Employment Report, a mere 38,000 jobs were added in the private sector on a seasonally adjusted basis.  That was well below consensus estimates of 170,000 new jobs.  The report also revised downwards the estimated change from March to April from 179,000 to 177,000. “A deceleration in employment, while disappointing, is not entirely surprising,” the report said.  “In the 1st quarter, GDP grew at only a 1.8 percent rate and only about 2¼ percent over the last four quarters.  This is below most economists’ estimate of the economy’s potential growth rate and normally would be associated with very weak growth of employment.”

Patrick O’Keefe, director of economic research at J.H. Cohn, said that although some seasonal factors may have been at work in the recent claims data and in the ADP estimates, the report still disappointed.  “We can put away our balloons and party hats today,” he said.  “We expected a pull back in the rate of acceleration, instead we got deceleration.  It appears that the general expansion has lost a bit of momentum and employment numbers, which were already lethargic, are slowing further.”

“This only adds fuel to the argument that the slowdown story is here in the U.S.,” said Tom Porcelli, chief economist at RBC Capital Markets.  “I am fairly confident that people are going to be scaling back their estimates for nonfarm payrolls.  While it is a good thing that small and medium-sized companies are adding payrolls, there is no doubt that the pace has slowed.  This is exactly what we do not want when other significant data shows things are slowing down as well.  Having said that, I still do not believe the Fed will initiate QE3.”

Writing in the National Journal, Jim Tankersley takes a more optimistic viewpoint. According to Tankersley, “Reality is a little more positive and a lot more complicated than that.  Wall Street analysts are fairly united in their view that the recovery has entered a “soft patch,” just like it did last year, and that sooner or later, growth and job-creation are on track to pick up again.  Several analysts and columnists have been reminding Americans that recoveries from financial crises can often feel like stop-and-go traffic on the freeway.  For now, the economic brakes seem to be pumping.  The 2010 slowdown flowed from worries over Europe’s sovereign debt crisis.  This one is likely a combination of several factors.  The spike in oil and food prices has spooked confidence — though consumers are still spending apace, dipping into their savings to keep up — and may be driving businesses to scale back hiring.”

On the MarketWatch website, Rex Nutting says that “If you recall that government employment is declining by almost that much every month, the ADP report implies only a very small increase in total employment.  This is no way to get the unemployment rate down from nine percent.  The economy has been buffeted by both natural and man-made forces.  Extremely bad weather earlier in the year depressed activity, as did the surge in commodity prices, especially for energy and food.  Then the Japanese earthquake and tsunami knocked out vital supply chains.  Global economic growth, which had given a big boost to U.S. exporters, is slowing. Europe is dead in the water, so is Japan.  The fast-growing developing nations such as China, India and Brazil are downshifting to avoid overheating.  The strongest sector of the U.S. economy — manufacturing — is still growing, but the momentum is fading.  The Institute for Supply Management’s closely watched diffusion index (Defined by Investopedia as “A measure of the breadth of a move in any of the Conference Boards Business Cycle Indicators (BCI), showing how many of an indicators components are moving together with the overall indicator index) plunged by 6.9 points to 53.5 percent in May, the largest one-month decline since 1984.

Companies may need to start hiring again as a new report from the Department of Labor is showing that the productivity of American workers slowed in the 1st quarter and labor costs rose as companies boosted employment to meet rising demand.  The measure of employee output per hour increased at a 1.8 percent annual rate after a 2.9 percent gain in the prior three months, revised figures from the Labor Department showed today in Washington, D.C.  Employee expenses climbed at a 0.7 percent rate after dropping 2.8 percent the prior quarter.

Productivity measures the amount of output per hour of work.  A slowdown in growth is bad for the economy if it persists.  But it can be good in the short term when unemployment is high because it can mean that companies are reaching the limits on how much extra output they can get from their existing work forces.  Output grew 3.9 percent in 2010, the biggest increase since 2002.  But many economists believe it will slow to 50 percent of that rate this year.  The expectation is that companies will hire new workers to further boost output.